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Christian
English Major
Writer
Thinker of odd things

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Movies: reflections or perpetrators? [Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2005, 7:28 pm]

As usual, I have quotes, concepts, and ideas floating around in my head right now, which I can't always put my finger on, or discover the significance of. But I can still share them with those who are bored enough to read this diary, so why not?:

[From an article about M. Night Shyamalan]

"That, and much of the film's dialogue and plot [The Village], reflect Shyamalan's fondness for a more innocent time and the simple things of life. "I would love to live in a time where people said what they meant without sarcasm," he says, "and where it was OK to fall in love and ask permission to marry and where a guy can say, 'The world moves for love and kneels before it in awe'" a line he wrote for the character played by William Hurt. "I want a world where you can say that. I believe the world can still work that way.""

Also, there's this techno song I've been listening to over and over again on iTunes. It's a beat by Ian Van Dahl called "Castles in the sky". It doesn't have many lyrics, but at points in the song, this same line is repeated continually:

"Oh tell me why....do we build castles in the sky? Oh tell me why... all the castles way up high..."

It seems like a little lament about unreal fantasies that we make, which I'm sure we've all had/have, especially those with active imaginations, (like me). Sometimes I wonder if entertainment plays more of a part in this than we'd like to admit.

I remember reading something in Charles Lindbergh's autobiography, about why his grandfather (or father, I can't remember) was opposed to movies. This is just a paraphrase, but he said something like, "Movies promote wrong ideas because the way they portray relationships between boys and girls is very inaccurate." And this was the 1920's! Imagine how much truer that is today.

Why do so many people seem to try to pattern their real-life relationships after those they see on the screen? People are even starting to end arguments the same way. Think about it... how to most on-screen arguments end? Somebody walks out. Why? Because the film (or show) has a time limit on it, and they just aren't able to show us an accurate, drawn-out argument/discussion about something, because it would take up too much time.

There are way too many "little things" that are inaccurately portrayed in movies, which would take me too long to talk about. It may seem like they don't matter, but I think they do, because if we get too caught up in living our lives and behaving a certain way (like, the way made-up characters do it on the screen), we lose something. Maybe what we're losing is the ability to be "real", because we just want to be like the fake people that don't even exist. I'm trying to think of a better word than "real", but I can't. We don't want to be real, or honest, or genuine anymore.

I'm not trying to blame movies for all our problems, or anything. I watch them, obviously, and I like a good love story too. But how has our thinking been influenced by them? How differently do we view relationships now than we did 100 years ago? Is honesty better than fantasy?

I can think about this all day, but is there anything I can do about it?

*Laura*

wander -- travel

Miss anything?

Vitality - Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2009
Soulfest 2009 - Sunday, Aug. 02, 2009
Politics and Poverty - Friday, Jul. 24, 2009
Michael Jackson - Monday, Jun. 29, 2009
Elegy for Spotty - Wednesday, Jun. 24, 2009